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Starbucks Offers Paid Tuition to Employees

Starbucks recently announced its partnership with Arizona State University to offer a paid college education to its 135,000 United States employees.

The company is offering full reimbursement in ASU online courses for employees with two years of college credit and partial reimbursement for employees with less credit. The only thing the company requires to be eligible for the program is that the employee works at least 20 hours per week and maintains decent grades, according to the New York Times.

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Transportation Department Takes on Navigation Apps

We all know that texting while driving is not only extremely dangerous, but also illegal in almost every state. But what happens when you are using a navigation app? What category does this distraction fall into, and should it be treated the same way as texting while driving? The New York Times delves deeper into the issue and the impact that the proposed transportation bill will have on the issue.

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Who Is David Brat?

In the wake of yesterday’s historic upset, Americans are scrambling to find out who exactly is David Brat, the man who defeated the House majority leader in the primary elections.


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DC2024: Washington's Effort to Secure the 2024 Summer Olympics

In a city where lobbying is one of the most common practices, Washington, D.C.’s under-the-radar lobbying efforts for the 2024 Summer Olympics may have been one of the quietest campaigns in the nation’s capital, The Washington Post Reports.

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Parents Fight for Students’ Privacy Rights

Parents have joined forces over the past year to lobby against both government and private-sector data-mining practices on students.

The “amateur activists” first focused on privately owned data collection agencies, which were able to advance unhindered in the wake of the scandals surrounding the NSA and the subsequent Congressional crackdown. The most powerful organizations are now able to collect “as many as 10 million unique data points on each child, each day,” according to POLITICO. One such company, inBloom, cracked earlier this spring under the growing pressure of the parent-led privacy movement.

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What Do Students Want Teachers To Know?

With the school year coming to a close, New York Times reporter Jessica Lahey took the time to ask students what they wished teachers knew.With the school year coming to a close, New York Times reporter Jessica Lahey took the time to ask students what they wished teachers knew.

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Will Virginia Government Shutdown? McAuliffe Says No

Thousands of Virginia state workers, 107,000 to be exact, are terrified of losing their jobs, due to an unresolved budget battle. If the General Assembly does not pass a state budget by July 1, government shutdown may be the consequence. What’s causing the disagreement? Medicaid.

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Sen. Warren: “A Fighting Chance” for Middle Class, Students

In a recent interview with PBS affiliate, Judy Woodruff, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D, Mass.) discussed her newly published memoir, “A Fighting Chance,” and her effort to protect the middle class, particularly middle class students.


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Leggings: Trendy or Offensive?

Parents, students, and teachers are quickly finding out that leggings may no longer be deemed acceptable in their school systems. It has become a popular trend of school administrators to ban certain attire that may cause distraction to other students, with leggings being the first to go.

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Virginia’s Ban on Same-Sex Marriage is Challenged

According to The Washington Post, Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage raised a heap of controversy in a federal appeals court on Tuesday. The 4th Circuit panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals was called to review the February ruling that bans and bars recognition of same-sex marriage and any type of legal union that resembles marriage in Virginia. The arguments swayed back and forth involving topics ranging from a seemingly related previous landmark court case to the effects that same-sex marriage has on the partners’ children. Two judges with polar opposite views acquired one question to be answered: does Virginia have the right to ban same-sex marriage or is the ban defended by the constitution’s depiction of marriage?


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